Eleanor Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891

Colorization by Manos Athanasiadis

Colorization by Manos Athanasiadis

Mrs Eleanor Xiniwe (nee Ndwanya) of the African Choir, 1891. Photographed by London Stereoscopic Company studios. Courtesy of Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Mrs Eleanor Xiniwe (nee Ndwanya) of the African Choir, 1891 (Photographed by London Stereoscopic Company studios. Courtesy of Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

The African Choir were a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. Inspired by Orpheus M. McAdoo’s Virginia Jubilee Singers, they were a Christian choir on a mission to raise funds for a technical school in Kimberley in the Cape Colony (South Africa). The Choir’s members, drawn from seven different South African tribes, included Paul Xiniwe and his wife Eleanor, Sannie Koopman, Charlotte Makhomo Manye, Johanna Jonkers, Josiah Semouse and a Miss Gwashu. Their best known performance was before Queen Victoria at Osborne House, the royal residence on the Isle of Wight.

(Mrs. Eleanor Xiniwe) is a young lady-like, native woman, the regularity of whose features despite her sable complexion, vies with most European faces, and who has dignified and rather stately manners. – London Illustrated News, August 29, 1891

The Illustrated London News, August 29, 1891

The Illustrated London News, August 29, 1891

At some point during their stay, they visited the studio of the London Stereoscopic Company to have group and individual portraits made on plate-glass negatives. They are the first black people ever photographed in Britain. That long-lost series of photographs, unseen for 120 years, was the dramatic centrepiece of an illuminating new exhibition called Black Chronicles II. “The portraits were last shown in the London Illustrated News in 1891,” says Renee Mussai, who has co-curated the show at London’s Rivington Place alongside Mark Sealy MBE, director of Autograph ABP, a foundation that focuses on black cultural identity often through the use of overlooked archives. “The Hulton Archive, where they came from, did not even know they existed until we uncovered them while excavating their archive as part of our research project.”
The London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company specialised in carte de visites – small photographs printed on cards that were often traded by collectors or used by performers for publicity purposes – and, as their name suggests, they were all in stereo which, when seen through a special viewer, gave the illusion of a three-dimensional photograph.
Sources:
Guardian
Autograph ABP: Black Chronicles II
Lasca Sartoris.tumblr.com

 

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One thought on “Eleanor Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891

  1. Pingback: Photographic portraits of black lives and experiences in nineteenth and early twentieth-century Britain | Goldtop

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